PhD Students

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2011/2012
  • Doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2016/2017

    Josip was born in Pula - Pola in Istria, present day Croatia. After leaving the hospital he settled in his family home in Porec - Parenzo and to this day Josip is a proud civis communis Parentii. He received his B.A. in history and English language and literature at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (2011) and his M.A. in medieval history at the same university (2014). Thereafter he worked as a curator trainee in museum Lapidarium in Novigrad - Cittanova and in the fall of 2015 he enrolled in the one-year M.A. programme in medieval studies at Central European University in Budapest. Following a successful defence of his M.A. thesis and after having received the Outstanding Academic Achievement award, Josip was granted admission to the PhD programme in medieval studies at Central European University (2016). He is currently working on his PhD thesis, conducting archival research in numerous archives across the Northern Adriatic. His main scientific focus lies in the Northern Adriatic region in the High and late Middle Ages with a specific focus on medieval Istria and the interplay between Venice and the Patriarchate of Aquileia. Josip is the author of several original scientific papers (published in English, Italian and Croatian) and his first monograph is scheduled to be published in 2018.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2010/2011

    Ünige Bencze graduated History and Archaeology at the Babeş-Bolyai University of Cluj-Napoca in 2007. She finished MA at the Department of Medieval Studies at the Central European University of Budapest in 2008. Ünige is currently a doctoral candidate at the same department at CEU. She works on the historical development of monastic orders in medieval Transylvania and their impact on the religious, social and economic life of the region. Her work will also focus on the landscape analysis of the researched monasteries with two special case studies, one on Carta (Kerc,Kerz) Cistercian monastery and the other on Cluj-Manastur (Kolozsmonostor) Benedictine monastery.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2015/2016

    Studied at University of Zagreb (BA in History) and Central European University (MA in Medieval Studies).
    My dissertation project aims to position the order of St. Paul the first hermit within the religious, social, economic, and political sphere and context of medieval Croatia and Istria, by looking at it through the prism of patronage. It encompasses all social levels of the benefactors – from local burghers, through lower nobility and aristocracy, up to the king.
    I will also follow the patronage and development of the Franciscan order as both the Paulines and the Franciscan competed for the patronage of the same social strata – mostly aristocracy and rich burghers. Furthermore, the Franciscans and the Paulines were the two biggest orders in the region.
    This project will offer insight into local peculiarities and patterns regarding the emergence of the Pauline order in the given regions, monastic foundations, their development, evolution, and transition towards the mendicants. It will also offer possible answers regarding emergence of the Vicariate of Gvozd, its structure, ways of functioning, the role of Croatian language and Glagolitic script within the order, possible outside influences, and the role of the Paulines in the creation of local and regional pilgrimages places. This project will also inspect the reasons, ways, costs, and benefits of the monastic patronage for all sides, and the influence that it had on monastic economy and local communities. All this will be followed with extensive comparative material, ranging from a local level to that of the Kingdom of Hungary-Croatia. In the end, the results regarding monastic patronage will be compared and placed in a broader European context.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2011/2012

    Vedran Bileta graduated History at the Juraj Dobrila University of Pula in 2008. He finished MA at the Department of Medieval Studies at the Central European University of Budapest in 2010. Vedran is a student of late antiquity specializing in western Mediterranean area (with particular focus on Italy), and his research interests are socio-political and economical history of the Late Roman Empire with a focus on the relationship between the emperor, military and civil elites.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2012/2013

    Mariana Bodnaruk is a doctoral candidate studying Late Antiquity at the Medieval Studies Department, Central European University (Budapest). She is currently working on a doctoral project titled ‘Production of Distinction: Senatorial Self-representation in the Later Roman Empire, 306-395,’ mainly focusing on the socio-political rôle and representations of senatorial élites, eastern and western, in the later Roman Empire. She is also a research assistant at the Visual Culture Research Center in Kyiv (Ukraine). Her research interests include social and political history of the later Roman Empire and early Byzantium, Late Roman aristocracies, late-antique epigraphy, cultural history, and visual studies.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2016/2017

    Leslie Carr-Riegel studied at Kalamazoo college in the U.S.A. before receiving her B.A. degree from the American University at Rome. Sha has an MA in Medieval Studies from the University of Durham, UK, and a second from the Central European University where is now a Doctoral candidate focusing on urban social history of Late Medieval Poland. Her previous work has been dedicated to road repairs, medieval waste management and the patronage of twelfth-thirteenth century Cosmatesque art in Rome and its environs. Previous to her studies at CEU, she taught English in Rome and worked for two years at the Tainjin Chengjian University (天津城建大学). She is deeply interested in the everyday life of the past, patronage networks, and the power of assumptions.

  • Doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2017/2018

    Çiçek Dereli holds a BA in German Literature, Linguistics and Didactics from Marmara University in Istanbul (2007) and an MA in Cultural Heritage Studies from Central European University in Budapest (2017). In her MA thesis, she introduced three interwoven narratives of the Monastery of Saint John the Forerunner of Studios: the historical, the visual and the heritage oriented. The visual narrative formed the key-stone of her research and was presented in the form of a visual catalog. Her current PhD project focuses on the historical, religious, memorial and cultural biography of the Monastery of Saint John the Forerunner of Studios.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2012/2013
  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2013/2014

    In the first centuries of Christianity, eschatology had been rarely treated in a dogmatic way. Although some basic assumptions could not be neglected, ambiguities in Scripture left sufficient room for interpretation. Towards the end of the 6th century, the debate about the destiny of the soul after death became a matter of urgency. The two most outstanding authors dealing with this problem were Pope Gregory the Great and the Constantinopolitan presbyter Eustratius. While both author's works differ in style and focus, they betray an astonishing amount of similarities, especially concerning their refutation of the idea of a “soul sleep” after death. Their works indicate an interest in eschatological issues among the contemporaries that was transgressing the boarders between the so-called East and West. This should not surprise us: Neither politically nor economically, and even less culturally, have the Eastern and Western areas been strictly detached from each other, at least not in the period I am dealing with.
    However, both Gregory and Eustratius were not only shaped by their historical circumstances, but also based their thoughts (implicitly or explicitly) on the works of their theological predecessors. The importance of Augustine for Gregory's theology has been well-established by scholarship, and his thoughts might be also reflected in Eustratius work. Other authors have been important for 6th century eschatology as well. In order to contextualize the developments of the late sixth century appropriately in a diachronic perspective, it is inevitable to get an idea of the broader developments of the conceptions of the afterlife in Christianity, starting from as early as the Apostolic fathers up to at least the early seventh century.
    Although scholarship has broadened our knowledge about 6th century eschatology in the last decades, there is still the lack of a wider interpretative historical synthesis. Therefore, I attempt to analyze the thoughts of selected Christian authors about the life after death against a cultural and historical background, using as a starting point the works of Gregory the Great and Eustratius of Constantinople. Such an analysis requires a cultural historical approach, focusing not only on the intellectual influences but also on the social and cultural circumstances of each theologian dealing with the afterlife. What is more, it can just be successfully accomplished if it is based on a scrutinizing philological examination of the relevant sources.
    Within this proposed framework, it will be possible to specify the particularities of (late) 6th century eschatology. What were the important topics discussed among the contemporaries about the afterlife? In what respect were these debates continuations of long-lasting theological disputes? What were their innovative aspects, and what issues were ignored? Do eschatological conceptions differ between the various regions, between East and West, or can common debates be traced? What are the reasons for differences or similarities? A detailed analysis of the relevant sources together with a close investigation of the contemporary social and cultural circumstances will hopefully offer satisfying new answers to these intriguing questions.

  • Probationary doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2018/2019

    Tea graduated in art history and Italian language and literature from the University of Zagreb. She has an MA in Medieval Studies from Central European University.

    Tea’s continued research of visual culture in the Northern Adriatic region in the late Middle Ages is currently focused on late medieval wall paintings in inland Istria and their broader stylistic, iconographic, and historical frameworks. In addition to her present research, her interests include medieval image theory, late medieval macabre, medieval concepts of emotion and affectivity, and issues of visual representation and reception.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2012/2013

    János Incze obtained a BA degree in History and an MA in Protection and evaluation of the cultural heritage at Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj Napoca, and another MA degree in Medieval Studies at Central European University (CEU), Budapest. János is currently a PhD candidate of the Medieval Studies program at the CEU. His main research interest lies in King Sigismund of Luxemburg’s finances in Hungary.

  • Doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2016/2017

    Ines received her BA in 2012, and MA in 2015 in Portuguese language and literature and Art History from University of Zagreb. During her studies in Zagreb, she dealt with the historical documents relevant to the development of medieval architecture in Dubrovnik. Her master's thesis "The cult and the church of saint Petilovrijenci in Dubrovnik" was awarded by the Croatian Society of Art Historians ("Radovan Ivančević" award for best thesis in 2015).

    In 2016, she continued her studies on CEU, where she earned an MA in Medieval Studies with the specialization in Religious Studies. In her thesis "The cult of Saint Jerome in Late Medieval Dalmatia" she was dealing with the characteristics and the manifestations of the cult in Trogir and Dubrovnik. Her work was awarded as one of the best theses by Centre for Religious Studies, CEU.

    Currently, she is enrolled as a PhD student in the department of Medieval Studies, continuing her research on the cult of Saint Jerome in the Medieval Dalmatia. The aim of her thesis is to distinguish different traditions of worship in Late Medieval Dalmatia, their characteristics, and manifestations, as well as the common connection points, in order to describe the development of the formation of the common identity present in Dalmatia in the 15th century through the worship of the saint.

  • probationary doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2018/2019

    Olga graduated from Moscow State University with a BA degree in History of Southern and Western Slavs. In her undergraduate thesis, she studied criticism towards the Church at the University of Prague and its role in the formation of Hus’ doctrine. While working on her MA at the Medieval Studies Department at CEU, she has shifted her focus to one of Hus’ precursors - Iohannes Milicius, his provocative activity in 14th-century Bohemia, and its possible connections with early Italian humanism.

    Currently, Olga focuses on sermon studies and is working on her dissertation “The Father of the Bohemian ‘Reformation’: Iohannes Milicius de Cremsir's Criticism of the Church in Pre-Hussite Bohemia” at the Doctoral Program at CEU. Her research interests include not only religious history and Slavic studies, but also codicology, Latin and Czech paleography, intellectual history, and discourse analysis.

  • Doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2016/2017

    Iliana graduated from the Higher School of Economics, Moscow with a BA degree in History. While pursuing her MA at the Medieval Studies Department at CEU she has further developed her existing interest in mechanisms of symbolic communication and their representation in narrative sources of the Ottonian Age; her MA thesis was devoted to the ritual of royal penance. Currently, she is enrolled in the Doctoral Program at CEU and works on the dissertation entitled “The Cult of the Royal Couple: Henry II and Cunigunde in Hagiographic Tradition, Art and Liturgy (1100-1600)”.
    Canonizations of Emperor Henry II (973/978-1024) in 1146 and his wife Cunigunde (c.980-1033) created a unique phenomenon of royal sanctity for Medieval Europe and especially for the Holy Roman Empire. Henry II and Cunigunde are the only canonized imperial couple: even though their canonization campaigns were conducted separately, the retrospective idea of venerating Henry and Cunigunde rapidly developed in thirteenth century and continued since then. In this research project, Iliana is going to analyze the genesis and developments of the cult of Henry and Cunigunde, its role for various urban and ecclesiastical communities of the Holy Roman Empire and manifestations in different spheres as literature, art and liturgy.

  • probationary doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2018/2019

    Csete has received his BA and MA in History at the University of Debrecen, Hungary. He obtained an additional MA in Viking and Medieval Norse Studies from the University of Iceland His original research interest, Icelandic sagas, has recently shifted to the relationship between Vikings and the various Eastern nomadic Turkic tribes in the ninth and eleventh centuries. His thesis was defended at the Medieval Studies Department at CEU in 2018. Csete also studied archaeology at the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, and participated in excavations. He is also involved as a research fellow in the “Lendület” research project of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences entitled ‘Hungary in Medieval Europe’. He published several studies on the history and archaeology of the Vikings. Csete’s current research at CEU is an interdisciplinary, comparative study focusing on the formation and function of military retinues in Eastern Europe and Scandinavia between the ninth–eleventh centuries.

  • probationary doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2018/2019

    Anna obtained her BA in Liberal Arts, with a specialization in art history at Pázmány Péter Catholic University in Budapest, and wrote her thesis on the Gothic stone fragments found at the restoration of Oradea Castle. Following this, she worked at the Hungarian National Gallery's archives.
    Anna then graduated from Pázmány Péter Catholic University with an MA in Art History, where her thesis was about the twentieth-century restoration of Saint Michael's church in Cluj Napoca.
    In 2018, Anna received an MA in Late Antique, Medieval and Early Modern studies at CEU, and wrote her thesis about the use of ambulatories in fourteenth-century Central European cathedrals. Her present research continues this theme and focuses on the use of the eastern end of late Medieval cathedrals in Central Europe.

    https://ceu.academia.edu/AnnaKinde

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2008/2009
  • Doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2016/2017

    I am from New Zealand where I studied for a BA Hons at Victoria University of Wellington and an MA at the University of Auckland. I am is interested in the history of Gaul and Italy in the fifth and sixth centuries, in particular the formation and maintenance of social networks during this period. I am currently working with the methodologies of social network analysis and prosopography in my research. My current thesis is titled "Ennodius of Pavia and Social Networks in Ostrogothic Italy". In it I am examining the participation of the sixth-century writer and bishop Ennodius of Pavia in the social world of Ostrogothic Italy.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2017/2018

    Tünde holds a BA in Chinese Studies and a BA and MA in Medieval Archaeology from Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, as well as an MA in Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies (2-year program) from CEU. She studied a two-semester language course at Donghua University, Shanghai, China, supported by the combined scholarship of the Hungarian Scholarship Council (MÖB) and the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC), in the academic year 2011/2012, where she had the chance to deepen her Chinese language skills. She wrote her MA theses on Chinese porcelain finds deriving from Ottoman archaeological sites in Buda and the Castle of Eger.
    The main focus of her PhD research is the oriental import ceramics of the Ottoman Empire (Chinese porcelain, Persian faience and Iznik ware), with a special focus on Hungary and its place within the Empire. The goal of her dissertation is to analyze the archaeological assemblages of these ceramics and place them in the context of the international and domestic trade of the Ottoman Empire; to reconstruct networks of object movements; and to identify the users and social function of these ceramic types.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2013/2014

    Thesis Topic: Late Gothic Wall Painting in Transylvania
    Abstract: The Late Gothic period is often regarded as one of decline for the genre of wall painting. After a flourishing period in the first third of the fifteenth century, several authors speak about a loss of significance of the genre compared to other contemporary art forms (e.g. panel painting). This perception of decline contributed to Late Gothic wall painting being an understudied area of the art of medieval Hungary.
    It seems, however, that in the light of the surviving material this view of decline needs to be reconsidered and refined in several respects, while ultimately the usefulness of focusing on this concept can be questioned.
    In Transylvania, approximately thirty wall painting ensembles from this period are known. While only some of the ensembles stand out for their high quality, the material as a whole – although fragmentary – gives a sense of richness and variety.
    My thesis aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of Late Gothic wall painting in Transylvania concentrating on the following wider problems:
    • Questions related to style. Establishing stylistic connections between the wall painting ensembles and searching for models, analogies and stylistic connections with works from other regions; questions of dating.
    • The question of interaction with other genres, especially with panel painting: questions of production, masters active in both genres, specific techniques and formats characteristic for panel painting applied in wall painting. How innovations in other genres affect wall painting?
    • The study of specific iconographic themes, their way of representation, meanings and associations; the correlation of their iconography and their placement within the space of the church; studying patterns of decoration, iconographic programs, patterns in the selection of the iconographic themes; examining how these choices can be explained and interpreted in the contexts of late medieval religiosity and devotion, also considering possible patrons and audiences.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2011/2012
  • probationary doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2018/2019

    Marino received his BA in 2012 and MA in History and English Language and Literature in 2014 from the University of Split, where he wrote a thesis which explored the problems of continuity and discontinuity of military fortifications in Late Antiquity and early medieval Dalmatia. He received his second MA in Medieval Studies at Central European University, Budapest in 2016 after completing a thesis which investigated textual and physical demonstrations of Christian piety in ninth-century Croatia. After graduating from CEU, he was employed as archivist by the Museum of Croatian Archaeological Monuments, where he worked on a letter collection ascribed to Vladimir Ardalić, a nineteenth-century amateur archaeologist who is credited with discoveries of many early medieval archaeological sites in Dalmatia. From 2018, Marino is enrolled as a probationary doctoral candidate at CEU, where he seeks to expand upon his earlier work on Late Antique and early medieval Dalmatia and Croatia.

  • probationary doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2018/2019

    Gaetano Longo received his BA in Philosophy in 2012 from the University of Salerno, and his MA in Medieval Studies in 2018 from the Central European University. In 2006 he spent a semester at Humboldt University, Berlin, as an Erasmus student.
    His current research focuses on the philosophy of the last scholarch of the School of Athens, Damascius by taking into account his treatise Difficulties and Solutions About the First Principles and his Commentary on Plato’s Parmenides.
    Gaetano also translated a monograph on Plato’s Parmenides by Franz von Kutschera [to be published], an essay on Plato by Vittorio Hösle and other shorter texts into Italian.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2015/2016

    My PhD project focuses on Italian culture and religiosity in the second half of fifteenth century. This has been a particularly crucial period for Italy, due to the diffusion the new studia humanitatis, which had reached all parts of the peninsula; due to the contrasts this new culture had with the dominant scholastic culture; due to the lively religious ferments, asking for ecclesiastical reform, but also for the lay participation to theological and doctrinal discussion. What my research proposes is to try and investigate some aspects of this culture and religiosity through the traces we can read of them in a peculiar source, the model sermon collections of the Franciscan preacher Roberto Caracciolo da Lecce (1425-1495).
    Roberto Caracciolo has been one of the best known popular preachers of his time and by far the most printed preacher of the fifteenth century (eighty different incunabulum editions of his works are known, for a total of more than three-hundred printed sermons). His works were extremely successful, diffused all over Europe, used for preaching by other friars, and read both by a devout and a more intellectual public.
    This kind of source is particularly valuable to investigate contemporary intellectual, cultural and religious history, because of the genre’s characteristic bond with the most urgent peculiarities of contemporary audiences. Sermon collections’ value for studying history of culture and society has best been proven as far as the sermones reportati (those recorded by scribes or members of the audience, best if taken down in shorthand) are concerned, because of their obvious link to a very specific audience (as is the case, for example, for Bernardino da Siena’s reported vernacular sermons, which tell us a whole lot on mercantile urban societies of cities like Florence or Siena). This relationship is less visible in model sermon collections like Caracciolo’s: even if these same sermons were preached to a specific audience before being written down, we cannot appreciate any trace of it. However, these model sermons were clearly written to answer problems and necessities of contemporary audiences. Caracciolo himself states that he had picked up writing his own sermon collections precisely to cover a pressing requirement of arguments and topics for popular preachers which were necessary to convince an audience, like the Italian one of late fifteenth century, that was becoming more and more attentive and “curious” (this had been caused, he says, by the diffusion of the studia humanitatis, by the abundance of scholars in any subject, and by the frequent attendance of people to sermons). Finally, the fortune that these collections met among contemporaries is surely a signal of the success of Caracciolo’s plan.
    My work plan is: 1) to read all of Roberto Caracciolo’s sermons enucleating the topics mentioned and taking note of any extraordinary element; 2) to attempt a reconnection of some or all of the extraordinary elements noted to a broader context of debate, linking them to other contemporary sources, particularly theological, philosophical and literary texts (and, obviously, other sermon collections). My attention will concentrate primarily on elements regarding religious and intellectual debates and particularly: 1) “high cultural” theological and philosophical debates, 2) widespread unorthodox or heretical ideas, 3) elements of popular religiosity and superstition.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2017/2018

    Dunja received her BA degree (2013) and MA degree (2014) from the History Department at the Faculty of Philosophy (Belgrade University, Serbia). She also holds an MA in Medieval Studies from the Central European University (2017) where she is now currently enrolled as a Doctoral student. Her research focus is primarily on Byzantine literature, literary analysis and history of ideas. In her MA Thesis defended at the Central European University she dealt with two understudied satirical works written by Theodor Prodromos, a twelfth century Byzantine polymath. In this thesis she contributes to the recognition of the literary value of Prodromos’s Philoplaton or Leather Tanner and The Ignorant and Self-Proclaimed Grammarian and demonstrates how Prodromos by means of invective displays his own erudition and constructs the image of an overall intellectual authority. Her current PhD project is focused on the case of Prodromos in a broader sense and investigates how the self-image of a Byzantine intellectual was constructed through both - learned literary production and entangled interactions, debates and rivalries with the other contemporary intellectuals.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2017/2018

    Sanja Miljan has received B.A. in Latin Philology and History at the Centre of Croatian Studies, Universtiy of Zagreb, M.A. in Croatian Latinity at the Centre of Croatian Studies and M.A. in History at the Catholic University of Croatia. Sanja has joined the Deparment of Medieval Studies in 2017 as phd student. She is working on the institutional, social and economic history of the Franciscans in the Province of Slavonia/Dalmatia, from the arrival of friars up until the mid-fifteenth century. Her research interests also inculde editing of sources and translation of medieval legal documents.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Junior Research Fellow
    Year of enrollment : 2015/2016

    Emese Muntán graduated English and Hungarian Philology at Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca. She holds two MA degrees, one in Hungarian Philology with a specialization in Late Medieval and Early Modern Hungarian Literature from Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest and the other in Comparative History with a specialization in Religious Studies from Central European University, Budapest. Currently, Emese is a PhD student at the Medieval Studies Department at Central European University and she is a junior research fellow in the ERC research project, OTTOCONFESSION (The Fashioning of a Sunni Orthodoxy and the Entangled Histories of Confession-Building in the Ottoman Empire, 15th-18th Centuries) led by prof. Tijana Krstić. Her dissertation research concentrates on examining the missionary and pastoral activity of Bosnian Franciscan friars in Ottoman Rumeli in the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Her further research interests include: Catholic and Protestant Missions in the Ottoman Empire; Confession-, Community-, and State-building Processes in Early Modern Europe; and Late Medieval and Early Modern Cross-confessional Diplomacy between Europe and the Ottoman Empire.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2014/2015

    Radu Mustaţă studied classical philology at the University of Bucharest, and humanities at the Vivarium Novum Academy in Rome. He received his MA in Medieval Studies at Central European University in 2014, and his doctoral research focuses on the Syriac manuscripts of the Saint Thomas Christians from South India.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2012/2013

    2003–2008, Bachelor of Arts in History from Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University.
    2009–2011, MA in Comparative History: Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University (CEU), Budapest.
    2012 till present Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University (CEU).

    In my current Ph.D. dissertation, I study the political and cultural relations between the Byzantine Empire and Medieval Georgia. More specifically, I examine the reception of the Byzantine ideas and rhetorical traditions related to kingship in Medieval Georgia from the tenth up to the end of the twelfth century. I analyze the ways Byzantine paradigms of rulership (both literary and visual) were adopted in Georgia and facilitated to the evolution of conception of Georgian kingship. To understand better the complex process of transmission and reception, I trace the groups as well as individual agents who contributed to the spread of Byzantine culture in Medieval Georgia.

  • Doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2016/2017

    Petar was born and raised in Sofia, Bulgaria. He completed his undergraduate education at the University of Sheffield and after a spell on board of M/V Aegean Odyssey moved to Budapest to study at CEU. Petar participated in various positions on archaeological projects in Bulgaria, England, Greece, Italy, Russia and Hungary.
    His research interests focus on the funerary and conflict archaeology with emphasis on Southeastern Europe. His PhD project deals with the medieval deviant burial customs in the region. In it, Petar explores how mortuary behavior is effected by law enforcement and religious beliefs in a long-term diachronic perspective.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2014/2015

    Zsuzsa Pető graduated from Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE), Budapest with a BA in History and Archaeology (Archaeology of Medieval and Early Modern Ages and Ancient Greek Archaeology) in 2009. She recieved her MA summa cum laude from ELTE in Archaeology (Archaeometry and Archaeology of Medieval and Early Modern Ages) in 2013 and a MA in Medieval Studies from CEU in 2014, where she is a PhD student currently. Her dissertation deals with the medieval monastic space of the Pauline order in the Carpathian Basin. Her research interests include landscape archaeology of medieval Europe, material culture, political, social, and environmental history, archaeological methodology (GIS and other applied methods), and the archaeology of monasteries, churches, settlements, and castles. She worked as a visiting lecturer at the University of Pécs and as an archaeologist at several institutions (currently at the Hungarian National Museum).

  • Doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2015/2016

    At CEU I defended my MA thesis titled "Popes, prelates, pretenders: the role of the high clergy of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia in the fight for the Hungarian throne in the fourteenth century" where I examined connections between the popes, the high clergy, and the pretenders while considering the roles they played during the succession crises for the Hungarian throne at the beginning and the end of the fourteenth century. The focus was on two succession crisis periods: the first (1290-1310) was a successful attempt by Charles Robert, backed by the Apostolic See, especially Pope Boniface VIII, to claim the throne; the second crisis (1382-1409) was a failed effort of Boniface IX and King Ladislas of Naples to take the throne from King Sigismund. Since the high clergy found themselves confronted between their obedience to the pope, and their fealty to the king, I focused my research on the archbishops and bishops of the dioceses of medieval Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia and their roles, functions and loyalties that have not been thoroughly researched before.

    I continued my research on the role of the high clergy, particularly archbishops and bishops, in the development of the local Church on the PhD level. With my project, provisionally titled "Development and Organization of the Church in Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia in the 14th Century," l want to contribute in furthering the understanding of the development of ecclesiastical structures as well as changes in the election process, the relationship between the diocese and the bishop, and the connections between the bishop and the pope or the king. By focusing on the long-term changes I plan to observe the development and characteristics of dioceses of Croatia, Dalmatia and Slavonia.

    Research Interests:
    Ecclesiastical history; Local history; Prosopography; Politics and diplomacy; Social history; XIII-XV centuries

    https://ceu.academia.edu/Miso_Petrovic

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2014/2015

    Stephen Pow previously got an MA from the University of Calgary in history. The aim of his doctoral dissertation is primarily to provide an explanation for the abrupt Mongol withdrawal from Europe, or more precisely Latin Christendom, in 1242, while then explaining the purposes of continued Mongol involvement in Europe for the next half-century. A single, satisfying explanation for the sudden withdrawal of the Mongols in 1242 is still a desideratum in medieval and military historiography. The causes were likely manifold, though they related to larger military problems such as the lack of willing allies, the relatively small numbers of invaders, and the major issue of numerous fortresses and fortified settlements. Moreover, recent scholarship on the Mongols has increasingly recognized the importance that negotiations, blandishments, offers of alliance, and ultimatums all played in the successful expansion of the Mongol Empire across Eurasia. Thus, we can see Mongol diplomatic efforts, renewed invasions, and continual threats to European powers after 1242 as being part of a continuing project of the Mongols to eventually subjugate the region.
    This dissertation is a “re-visiting” of all the relevant issues pertaining to the first Mongol invasion, the reasons for the withdrawal, and the subsequent role of the Golden Horde in Europe. It is my view that a satisfying explanation to the Mongol withdrawal in 1242 has not yet been offered by modern scholars, despite their wide recognition that such an explanation would be both important and useful for understanding what played out in subsequent centuries with European efforts at exploration and cross-cultural contacts. Determining what Mongol policies vis-à-vis Europe were meant to achieve in the thirteenth century is useful for a better understanding the Mongol military system and the factors which determined the borders of that empire.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2014/2015

    Studied at the University of Zagreb from 2007 to 2012 (BA in History, 2010; MA in History, 2013) and the Central European University in Budapest (MA in Comparative History: Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies, 2014).
    My dissertation project deals with ecclesiastical reform in the thirteenth century. Combining the development of canon and Roman law in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and the rise of the papal monarchy in the same period, my aim is to see if and how the process of reform as instituted by the Roman Curia at the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 managed to transfer into Central Europe. Mainly focussing on the ecclesiastical hierarchies of Hungary-Croatia, Poland, and Bohemia in the century after the council I hope to provide an analysis of themes such as legal transfers and impact taking into account the specific character of church reform within the Central European region. The study will revolve around thousands of letters of correspondence between bishops and popes as well as charter evidence and other sources pointing to a discernable reform initiative correlating with the Lateran agenda of the thirteenth century, legally and to a degree politically.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2015/2016

    Grabiela studied Political Science and Classical Literature at the University of the Andes (Mérida, Venezuela) and the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina). She earned an MA in Medieval Studies at Central European University and her current doctoral research focuses on the intellectual and political language of the Venetian governors in cities of the stato da mar.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2017/2018

    I received my BA and first MA degrees (from HSE, Moscow) studying Foucault's "theory," particularly, the question to what extent Foucauldian works impacted historiography (on the example of the Annales School).

    In my second MA and in my prospective PhD dissertation (both in CEU), I am exploring the Renaissance intellectual culture of the sixteenth century. The main questions of my research are how the Florentine intellectuals (artists included) perceived the occult knowledge and, in general, what were their strategies for learning and scholarly work.

    My academic experience encompasses being a teaching assistant and an instructor (courses in History); I published several papers while participated in different scholarly projects. Currently, I am working as a tutor in the Roma Graduate Preparation Program (CEU).

  • Doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2016/2017

    Miraslau holds a B.A. in History from American University in Bulgaria (2012) and an M.A. in Medieval Studies from Central European University (2014). His research interests include history-writing in medieval and early modern Central Europe and historical (medieval) narratology. Miraslau's PhD project deals with identity-construction in historiographical literature of medieval and early modern Lithuania.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2014/2015

    Nirvana holds a BA in Swedish Language and Culture and Art History, as well as an MA in Art History from the University of Zagreb. She also obtained MA degree at the Department of Medieval Studies at CEU. She is currently writing a PhD dissertation provisionally entitled The Art of the Mithraic Cult in the Roman Province of Dalmatia under the supervision of Prof. Volker Menze.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2015/2016

    Iuliana Soficaru graduated from Al. I. Cuza University, Iasi, Romania with a BA in History, and from University of Bucharest, Romania, Department of Classical Philology. She received two MA degrees, in Greek and Roman History and Archeology from University of Bucharest and in Medieval Studies, from Central European University, Budapest. Her dissertation, Restoring the City’s Health: Medical Ecumenism and Public Health in Late Antiquity (provisional doctoral dissertation title) focuses on the way in which urban communities cope with disease and on the way in which health is embedded within medical, legal, and social discourses, thus offering valuable insight into social practices. Her research interests include history of medicine, history of public health, medicine in late antique Alexandria and Constantinople, urban centers in the Eastern Mediterranean, and discourse on health and disease.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2014/2015

    Karen Stark graduated summa cum laude from St. Mary's College of Maryland in St. Mary's City, MD with a BA in Archaeology and the Ancient World and a Minor in Museum Studies in 2010. She then received her MA in Medieval and Renaissance Studies from University College London in 2012 and a MA in Medieval Studies from Central European University in 2014. Her current research for the PhD dissertation focuses on the sacralization of space and landscape in the context of East-Central European Marian shrines from the 14th-16th centuries.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2013/2014

    Evren earned his BA in Law at Koç University and continued his studies at Central European University in the Department of Medieval Studies. His MA thesis explores the meaning of the Battle of Lepanto (1571) among late-sixteenth-century Ottoman historians. Since 2013, he has been a PhD student in the same department. His dissertation investigates how the epistemological bases of imperial legislation and archival practices of its enforcement relate to the nature of imperial governance grounded in the Islamic tradition and manuscript culture through an intellectual biography of a prominent chief jurisprudent (şeyhülislam) of the Ottoman Empire, Zekeriyazade Yahya Efendi (1561-1644), with a focus on his legislative thought.
    Evren's research interests include intellectual and cultural history of the Ottoman Empire as well as manuscript cultures in the pre-modern period.

  • Doctoral Candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2015/2016

    My Ph.D project focuses on the late antique debate on the idea of creation versus eternal existence of the world. I intend to present the arguments for and against the eternity of the world from its inception in the classical period till its transformations in late antiquity. Prompted by the earlier debate during the classical period, starting with Plato and Aristotle, I will focus on the subsequent interpretation of the Timaeus by the authors in Late Antiquity and its implications for Christian and pagan philosophy. My main concern will be Plotinus’ treatise against the Gnostics and its genealogical relation with earlier debates and impact on later discussions.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2013/2014

    Dissertation abstract

    Environmental historical scholarship in the last few decades has demonstrated the complexity of the water-related disputes in a modern context. Several scholars have shown how methods employed in environmental history may contribute to questions which have been addressed mostly by legal, political or economic historians. This PhD dissertation aims to address the problems surrounding water management as places where different economic interests met.
    The dissertation proposes a study of water management in conflict landscapes, in places where the different actors – landowners, those who used the water for any purpose – had different interests. The sources such a study requires are fundamentally legal in character. However, the primary aim of the dissertation is not the pursuit of legal developments in water management. The legal character of these sources not only permits some conclusions on the legal understanding of water rights, but also provides significant data on environmental transformations and the way the water-land environment was perceived by the different actors living in a particular area. The way water was perceived is fundamental to understanding the logic informing communities in the way they manipulated and exploited in medieval Hungary. The disputes as well as the laws and regulations together with archaeological and topographic data from field surveys will provide an insight into the role of water in late medieval life in the Hungarian Kingdom.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2013/2014

    Mária Vargha has been graduated as an archaeologist and medievalist. Her current PhD thesis deals with the process of Christianisation and church organisation in Hungary. Despite that this topic is well researched and has been reconstructed using mainly written sources. However, given their paucity in this period, only the emergence of the most important bishoprics and archbishoprics are known while parishes (local churches), the smallest, but in a way the most important element of the church system, are not. Although historians have made many relatively successful attempts to reconstruct this process there are still some areas needing more comprehensive examination. It has not proved possible to reconstruct the parish system from the poor written sources even though these smaller entities encompassed the commoners who made up the largest segment of the population, thus playing a significant role in the process of Christianisation and church organisation. In this PhD thesis her aim is to concentrate on this smallest organisational element from a mainly archaeological point of view, and to create a picture of the local churches within the context of the parish organisation and thus, Christianisation that is not influenced by the results of historical research based on textual sources, but comes from the existing material sources: buildings, archaeological finds and features. The results of the analysis will be compared to the historical reconstruction of the same processes. The last element would be the investigation of the similarities and differences of the role of the Christianisation of the rural countryside as an element in the emergence of Christian monarchies of the region.

  • doctoral candidate
    Year of enrollment : 2008/2009